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By: Cynthia | December 19 2012 | Category: NIH Resources


The final blog from the National Institutes of Health Office of Science Education

I was very excited the day we started this blog. As a writer, it was another opportunity to do what I love (which is writing, of course!). But it’s time for the NIH SciEd Blog to retire. Through the blog, we’ve brought you updates on health and medical science research and news about science education resources and events. I’m a little sad to see it go, but I know we’ll continue to serve you in even more effective ways. Please join us on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and our Web site, where we’ll keep you up-to-date on what’s happening – and respond to your feedback and ideas – in real time:

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By: Debbie | September 24 2012 | Category: NIH Resources, Science Lite, Tidbits for Teachers


November 2 Cell Day Chat for Ms & HS StudentsThe Natonal Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) is committed to science education and encouraging future generations of scientists. To help mark our 50th anniversary, NIGMS will host an interactive Web chatroom about the cell for middle and high school students. Join us on Friday, November 2, 2012, anytime between 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. EDT. For more information about Cell Day, please see our FAQs page or send an e-mail to nigmscellday@nigms.nih.gov.

Link to Chat Information: http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/cellday2012/



For timely updates about science education, STEM, NIH research, and health and medical science, you can follow the NIH Office of Science Education through multiple channels:
By: Debbie | May 24 2012 | Category: Science History, Science Lite, Tidbits for Teachers


National Museum of Health and Medicine LogoThe National Museum of Health and Medicine opened its doors yesterday, May 21st, for the first time in its new location on Fort Detrick’s Forest Glen Annex in Silver Spring, MD just 5 miles from the National Institutes of Health main campus in Bethesda, MD.

Founded as the Army Medical Museum in 1862, the Museum celebrated its 150th anniversary as it opened its doors at its new location.  The Museum spotlights three themed exhibit rooms that are organized around topics as diverse as innovations in military medicine, traumatic brain injury, anatomy and pathology, military medicine during the Civil War, and the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln.  The institution's 25-million object collection includes diverse artifacts as well as graphic specimens.  The Human Developmental Anatomy Center (HDAC), part of the Research Collections division of the National Museum of Health & Medicine, acquires and maintains collections pertaining to general developmental anatomy and neuroanatomy.  This collection provides any researcher or student access to a central location from which to obtain data about normal development for both human and common research species.  The HDAC maintains and archives the largest collection of human and comparative developmental material in the United States.      

A unique feature of the museum is its primary collections storage room that allows visitors to peer into the room where staff re-house artifacts and archival materials and prepare artifacts for future exhibits and study.  The room allows visitors to watch the Museum at work.

To view information on NMHM exhibits and programs visit:  http://www.medicalmuseum.mil/index.cfm

To find more information about the historical understanding of biomedical research and the world check out NIH resources available at the U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, the world's largest history of medicine collections at:  http://www.nlm.nih.gov/hmd/index.html.

Written by Jennifer Gorman Wright



For timely updates about science education, STEM, NIH research, and health and medical science, you can follow the NIH Office of Science Education through multiple channels:
By: Debbie | May 8 2012 | Category: NIH Resources, Science and the Arts, Science Lite, Tidbits for Teachers


Weight of the Nation HBO series logo When eating out at a restaurant, pay attention to portion sizes. Some entrees are big enough to feed two people. Share a plate, or plan to take home half your meal. Learn more about America’s obesity problems by watching the HBO documentary series Weight of the Nation. To find more healthy eating tips, check out NIH resources: http://www.nih.gov/health/NIHandweightofthenation/


For timely updates about science education, STEM, NIH research, and health and medical science, you can follow the NIH Office of Science Education through multiple channels:

By: Debbie | April 19 2012 | Category: NIH Resources, Tidbits for Teachers


Evolution in Medicien Cover ImageTeachers can now order the FREE new curriculum supplement, Evolution in Medicine, sponsored by 11 participating National Institutes of Health (NIH) Institutes and Centers and the Office of the Director. This supplement for grades 9 through 12 allows students to explore evolutionary principles and learn how evolution informs human health, biomedical problems, and disease treatment. The supplement contains two weeks of lessons that are easily integrated into your curriculum and are aligned to national and state standards.  Order your FREE copy today!

The following lessons are included in Evolution and Medicine:

Ideas about the Role of Evolution in Medicine

Students learn to recognize that understanding the mechanisms of evolution, especially adaptation by natural selection, enhances medical practice and knowledge. Using an evolutionary tree, explore how common ancestry shapes the characteristics of living organisms.

Investigating Lactose Intolerance and Evolution

Students can understand that natural selection is the only evolutionary mechanism to consistently yield adaptations and that some of the variation among humans that may affect health is distributed geographically.

Evolutionary Processes and Patterns Inform Medicine

Students examine how health and disease are related to human evolution and understand why some diseases are more common in certain parts of the world. Analyze data and apply principles of natural selection to explain the relatively high frequency of disease in certain populations.

Using Evolution to Understand Influenza

Students understand how comparisons of genetic sequences are important for studying biomedical problems and informing public health decisions. Apply evolutionary theory to explain the emergence and spread of infectious diseases.

Evaluating Evolutionary Explanations

Students understand the importance of evidence in interpreting examples of evolution and medicine. Appreciate that natural selection and common ancestry can explain why humans are susceptible to many diseases.


For timely updates about science education, STEM, NIH research, and health and medical science, you can follow the NIH Office of Science Education (NIHSciEd) through multiple channels:
By: Debbie | March 30 2012 | Category: Science Lite, Scientists in the Community, Tidbits for Teachers




On March 15 National Institutes of Health (NIH) Director, Francis Collins, visited Bladensburg High School where he played guitar, sang, and spoke to students in the biomedical sciences program about exciting new research advances and rewarding careers in science & technology. Collins visited the students as part of the USA Science & Engineering Festival’s Nifty Fifty (times 2) program intended to help foster middle and high school student interest in science and engineering. The Bladensburg High School event was also a precursor to the second annual Festival that will be held April 28-29 at the Washington, D.C., Convention Center. Don’t worry if you missed this performance. You can see Dr. Collins perform at the Festival on Sunday, April 29, at 11:30 a.m. on Curie Stage.

You can read more about Dr. Collins' Bladensburg High School visit in a recent Gazette.net article.


For timely updates about science education, STEM, NIH research, and health and medical science, you can follow the NIH Office of Science Education through multiple channels:
By: Debbie | March 19 2012 | Category: Science News, Scientists in the Community, Tidbits for Teachers


Photo of Elizabeth GriceElizabeth Grice studies the bacteria that live on human skin. Her research sheds light on why chronic wounds don't heal and might point to new treatments for diabetic foot ulcers and other skin conditions. 

Read more about Elizabeth Grice in the latest issue of Findings, a publication of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH.

For timely updates about science education, STEM, NIH research, and health and medical science, you can follow the NIH Office of Science Education through multiple channels:
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