The Brain: Understanding Neurobiology
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The Brain: Understanding Neurobiology

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Teacher’s Guide

References

Introduction to the Module

  1. Loucks-Horsley, S., Love, N., Hewson, P.W., and Stiles, K.E. 1998. Designing Professional Development for Teachers of Science and Mathematics. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

Implementing the Module

  1. National Research Council. 1996. National Science Education Standards. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

Lesson 1—The Brain: What’s Going On in There?

  1. Friedman, D.P., and Rusche, S. 1999. False Messengers: How Addictive Drugs Change the Brain. Amsterdam: Harwood Academic Publishers.
  2. National Institute on Drug Abuse. 1997. Mind Over Matter: The Brain’s Response to Drugs. NIH Publication No. 98-3592. Retrieved November 14, 2007.
  3. Kandel, E.R.1991. Brain and behavior. In E.R. Kandel, J.H. Schwartz, and T.M. Jessell (Eds.), Principles of Neural Science, 3rd edition (pp. 5–17). Norwalk, CT: Appleton & Lange.
  4. Martin, J.H., Brust, J.C.M., and Hilal, S. 1991. In E.R. Kandel, J.H. Schwartz, and T.M. Jessell (Eds.), Principles of Neural Science, 3rd edition (pp. 309–324). Norwalk, CT: Appleton & Lange.
  5. Gatley, S.J., and Volkow, N.D. 1998. Addiction and imaging of the living human brain. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 51, 97–108.
  6. National Institute on Drug Abuse. 1996. The basics of brain imaging. NIDA Notes. Retrieved November 14, 2007.
  7. Lincoln, A. The Gettysburg Address.
  8. Damasio, H., Grabowski, T., Frank, R., Galaburda, A.M., and Damasio, A.R. 1994. The return of Phineas Gage: Clues about the brain from the skull of a famous patient. Science, 264, 1102–1105.
  9. Macmillan, M. The Phineas Gage information page. Exit Disclaimer

Lesson 2—Neurons, Brain Chemistry, and Neurotransmission

  1. Friedman, D.P., and Rusche, S. 1999. False messengers: How addictive drugs change the brain. Amsterdam: Harwood Academic Publishers.
  2. National Institute on Drug Abuse. 1997. Mind Over Matter: The Brain’s Response to Drugs. NIH Publication No. 98-3592. Retrieved November 14, 2007.
  3. Kandel, E.R. 1991. Nerve cells and behavior. In E.R. Kandel, J.H. Schwartz, and T.M. Jessell (Eds.), Principles of Neural Science, 3rd edition (pp. 18–32). Norwalk, CT: Appleton & Lange.
  4. Rowland, L.P., Fink, M.E. and Rubin, L. 1991. Cerebrospinal fluid: Blood-brain barrier, brain edema, and hydrocephalus. In E.R. Kandel, J.H. Schwartz, and T.M. Jessell (Eds.), Principles of Neural Science, 3rd edition (pp. 1050–1060). Norwalk, CT: Appleton & Lange.
  5. Society for Neuroscience. 1999. Blood-brain barrier.
  6. Darnell, J., Lodish, H., and Baltimore, D. 1990. Nerve cells and the electric properties of cell membranes. In Molecular Cell Biology, 2nd edition (pp. 763–814). New York: Scientific American Books, W.H. Freeman and Company.
  7. Guyton, A.C., and Hall, J.E. 1996. Organization of the nervous system; basic functions of synapses and transmitter substances. In Textbook of Medical Physiology, 9th edition (pp. 565–582). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders Company.
  8. Society for Neuroscience. 1999. The short answer: Definitions for common neuroscience terms.

Lesson 3—Drugs Change the Way Neurons Communicate

  1. Friedman, D.P., and Rusche, S. 1999. False Messengers: How Addictive Drugs Change the Brain. Amsterdam: Harwood Academic Publishers.
  2. National Institute on Drug Abuse. 2005. Mind Over Matter: The Brain’s Response to Drugs. NIH Publication No. 98-3592. Retrieved November 14, 2007.
  3. Kuhn, C., Swarzwelder, S., and Wilson, W. 1998. Buzzed: The Straight Facts about the Most Used and Abused Drugs from Alcohol to Ecstasy. New York: W.H. Norton & Company.
  4. Gross de Núñez, G., and Schwartz-Bloom, R.D. 1998. Animated neuroscience and the action of nicotine, cocaine, and marijuana in the brain. Princeton, NJ: Films for the Humanities & Sciences.
  5. National Institute on Drug Abuse. 2006. Methamphetamine abuse and addiction. NIDA Research Report. NIH Publication No. 06-4210.

Lesson 4—Drug Abuse and Addiction

  1. Steindler, E.M. 1998. ASAM addiction terminology. In Principles of Addiction Medicine, 2nd edition (pp. 1301–1304). Chevy Chase, MD: American Society of Addiction Medicine.
  2. Kuhn, C., Swarzwelder, S., and Wilson, W. 1998. Buzzed: The Straight Facts about the Most Used and Abused Drugs from Alcohol to Ecstasy. New York: W.H. Norton & Company.
  3. Friedman, D.P., and Rusche, S. 1999. False Messengers: How Addictive Drugs Change the Brain. Amsterdam: Harwood Academic Publishers.
  4. Childress, A.R., Mozley, P.D., Elgin, W., Fitzgerald, J., Reivich, M., and O’Brien, C.P. 1999. Limbic activation during cue-induced cocaine craving. American Journal of Psychiatry, 156, 11–18.
  5. Eriksson, P.S., Perfilieva, E., Bjork-Eriksson, T., Alborn, A.M., Nordborg, C., Peterson, D.A., and Gage, F.H. 1998. Neurogenesis in the adult human hippocampus. Nature Medicine, 4, 1313–1317.
  6. Villemagne, V., Yuan, J., Wong, D.F., Dannals, R.F., Hatzidimitriou, G., Matthews, W.B., Ravert, H.T., Musachio, J., McCann, U.D., and Ricaurte, G.A. 1998. Brain dopamine neurotoxicity in baboons treated with doses of methamphetamine comparable to those recreationally abused by humans: Evidence from [11C]WIN-35,428 positron emission tomography studies and direct in vitro determinations. Journal of Neuroscience, 18, 418–427.
  7. Fischer, C., Hatzidimitriou, G., Wlos, J., Katz, J., and Ricaurte, G. 1995. Reorganization of ascending 5-HT axon projections in animals previously exposed to the recreational drug (+)3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, “Ecstasy”). Journal of Neuroscience, 15, 5476–5485.
  8. Volkow, N.D., Hitzemann, R., Wany, G.-J., Fowler, J.S., Wolf, A.P., and Dewey, S.L. 1992. Long-term frontal brain metabolic changes in cocaine abusers. Synapse, 11, 184–190.
  9. National Institute on Drug Abuse. 1999. Drug abuse and addiction research: 25 years of discovery to advance the health of the public. NIDA Infofax. Retrieved September 8, 2000.
  10. Gogtay, N., Giedd, J.N., Lusk, L., et al. 2004. Dynamic mapping of human cortical development during childhood through early adulthood. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, 101(21), 8174–9.
  11. Joy, J.E., Watson, S.J., Jr., and Benson, J.A., Jr. (Eds.). 1999. Marijuana and medicine: Assessing the science base. Exit Disclaimer
  12. Stanton, M.D. 1976. Drugs, Vietnam, and the Vietnam veteran: An overview. American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, 3, 557–570.
  13. National Institutes of Health. 1996. Public health service policy on humane care and use of laboratory animals.

Lesson 5—Drug Addiction Is a Disease, So What Do We Do about It?

  1. Leshner, A.I. 1997. Addiction is a brain disease, and it matters. Science, 278, 45–47.
  2. Tobler, N.S., Roona, M.R., Ochshan, P., Marchall, D.G., Streke, A.V., Stackpole, K.M. 2000. School-based adolescent drug abuse prevention programs: 1998 Meta-analysis. Journal of Primary Prevention, 20, 275–335.
  3. O’Brien, C.P., and McLellan, A.T. 1998. Myths about the treatment of addiction. In Principles of Addiction Medicine, 2nd edition (pp. 309–313). Chevy Chase, MD: American Society of Addiction Medicine.
  4. National Institute on Drug Abuse. 2008. Treatment medications. NIDA Infofacts.
  5. Friedman, D.P., and Rusche, S. 1999. False Messengers: How Addictive Drugs Change the Brain. Amsterdam: Harwood Academic Publishers.
  6. National Institute on Drug Abuse. 2009. Principles of Drug Addiction Treatment: A Research-Based Guide, 2nd edition. NIH Publication No. 09-4180.
  7. National Institute on Drug Abuse. 2008. Treatment approaches for drug addiction. NIDA Infofacts.
  8. Baler, R.D., and Volkow, N.D. 2006. Drug addiction: the neurobiology of disrupted self-control. Trends in Molecular Medicine, 12, 559–66.

Glossary

  1. Friedman, D.P., and Rusche, S. 1999. False Messengers: How Addictive Drugs Change the Brain. Amsterdam: Harwood Academic Publishers.
  2. Society for Neuroscience. 1999. The short answer: Definitions for common neuroscience terms.
  3. Morris, C. (editor). 1999. Academic Press Dictionary of Science and Technology. San Diego: Academic Press.
  4. Brynie, F.H. 1998. 101 Questions Your Brain Has Asked about Itself but Couldn’t Answer Until Now. Brookfield, CT: Millbrook Press.

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