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Understanding Alcohol

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Teacher's Guide

Lesson 3—Explore/Explain

Responding to Alcohol: What’s Important?

At a Glance

Figure 3.1
Figure 3.1.
A variety of factors influences an organism’s response to alcohol.

Overview

In Lesson 3, students explore the effects of alcohol on the motor activity (movement) of mice by analyzing data from three experiments. In the first experiment, students investigate the effect of alcohol dose on mouse activity. In the second experiment, students track the effect of increasing time after alcohol consumption on mouse activity. In the third experiment, aimed at understanding the role of genetics in alcohol response, students compare the effects of alcohol dose on activity using two different strains of mice. Students make measurements, then graph and interpret their data. In each experiment, students are asked to draw conclusions about the animal’s response to alcohol.

Major Concepts

Alcohol produces a variety of effects on animal behavior including their movement. Alcohol exhibits a typical dose-response relationship: the greater the amount of alcohol consumed (dose), the greater the effect on behavior (response). Individuals within a population differ in their response to alcohol; some individuals are more sensitive to its effects than others. These differences in alcohol response have a genetic contribution. Since alcohol is metabolized at a constant rate by the body, the acute effects of alcohol decrease with increasing time after consumption.

Objectives

During this lesson, students will

Teacher Background

Consult the following sections in Information about Alcohol:

  1. 5 Alcohol: Pharmacokinetics
  2. 5.1 Absorption and distribution of alcohol in the body
  3. 5.2 Measurement of blood alcohol concentration (BAC)
  4. 5.3 Factors affecting alcohol absorption and elimination
  5. 5.4 Alcohol metabolism
  6. 6.1 Alcohol and the brain
  7. 6.2 Alcohol and body systems
  8. 7 Alcohol: Behavioral Effects
  9. 8.2 Alcoholism and genetics
  10. 10.1 The costs to society
  11. 10.3 Drinking and risky behavior
  12. 10.5 Drinking and violence

In Advance

Web-Based Activities
Activity Web Version?
1
Yes
2
No
Photocopies
Activity 1

Master 3.1, Study 1—Effect of Alcohol Dose on Mouse Movement (Make 1 copy per student.)
Master 3.2, Study 1—Mouse Movement Data (Make 1 copy per student.)a
Master 3.3, Study 1—Worksheet and Graph Template (Make 1 copy per student and prepare an overhead transparency.)
Master 3.4, Study 2—Effect of Time on Alcohol Response (Make 1 copy per student.)
Master 3.5, Study 2a—Control Mouse Movement Data (Make 1 copy per student.)a
Master 3.6, Study 2b—Experimental Mouse Movement Data (Make 1 copy per student.)a
Master 3.7, Study 2—Worksheet and Graph Template (Make 1 copy per student and prepare an overhead transparency.)
Master 3.8, Study 3—Effect of Genetics on Alcohol Response (Make 1 copy per student.)
Master 3.9, Study 3a—Mouse Movement Data (Make 1 copy per student.)a
Master 3.10, Study 3b—Mouse Movement Data (Make 1 copy per student.)a
Master 3.11, Study 3—Worksheet and Graph Template (Make 1 copy per student and prepare an overhead transparency.)

Activity 2 no photocopies needed
a Only needed for print-based version.
Materials
Activity 1 computers with Internet connection and a sound card
Activity 2 no materials needed except Masters 3.3, 3.7, and 3.11 from Activity 1

Teacher note
If multiple computers are not available, project images from a single computer for the class.

Preparation

If necessary, check with your computer lab personnel to determine which type of Internet connection your school uses. For Activity 1, you need to know whether you will use a modem, an ISDN line, or a T1 connection.

No preparations needed (except for photocopying). Make sure that the Internet connections are working and that the sound is functioning.

Procedure

Teacher note
The alcohol doses used in these experiments are described in units of grams of alcohol per kilogram of body weight. Students may ask how these doses compare with human consumption. The lowest dose of 1.5 grams of alcohol per kilogram of body weight corresponds to the amount of alcohol needed to cause an average-sized person to just reach the legal limit of intoxication. The doses of 2.0 and 3.0 grams of alcohol per kilogram of body weight correspond to higher levels of intoxication.

Teacher note
If possible, we recommend using the Web-based versions of the activities in this lesson. Instructions are provided first for the Web version of the activity and then for the print-based version.

Activity 1: Gathering Data

Web activity iconFor classes using the Web-based version of this lesson:

Study 1—Effect of Alcohol Dose on Mouse Activity

National Science Education Standards icon
Content Standard C:
Behavior is one kind of response an organism can make to an internal or external environmental stimulus.
  1. Log onto the Web site http://science.education.nih.gov/supplements/alcohol/student and click on “Lesson 1—Alcohol: Separating Fact from Fiction.” Select the type of Internet connection you are using (56k modem, ISDN, or T1) and click to play a mouse video.
  1. Introduce the activity by having the class review the two short video clips of the mice used during Lesson 1. Remind students which type of Internet connection your school uses. Ask students to recall their conclusions about the effects of alcohol on mouse behavior, especially with regard to the loss of inhibition.
  2. Explain to students that they will be analyzing data from three experiments that investigate the effects of alcohol on the movement of mice. They will begin by investigating the effects of alcohol dose on motor activity (movement) in mice.
  3. Instruct students to click on the “Student Activities” link to return to the “Web Portion of Student Activities” page.
  4. Give each student a copy of Master 3.1, Study 1—Effect of Alcohol Dose on Mouse Movement, and Master 3.3, Study 1—Worksheet and Graph Template.
  5. Instruct students to read Master 3.1, Study 1—Effect of Alcohol Dose on Mouse Movement. Be sure they understand how the experiment was performed and answer any questions.
  6. Next, instruct students to click on the link to Lesson 3—Responding to Alcohol: What’s Important? They should click on the “Start” button to listen to the introduction.

Students will hear a brief introduction to the activity and be taken into the virtual laboratory.

  1. Instruct students to click on the link to Study 1—Effect of Dose.

Students will read instructions asking them to select a mouse and count the number of grid lines it crosses. This number should be recorded in their data table on Master 3.3. This process is repeated for the three remaining mice.

Study 2—Effect of Time on Response to Alcohol

Teacher note
The experimental mice in this study were given alcohol at a dose of 3 grams alcohol/kg body weight.

  1. Give each student 1 copy of both Master 3.4, Study 2—Effect of Time on Alcohol Response, and Master 3.7, Study 2—Worksheet and Graph Template.
  2. Instruct students to read Master 3.4, Study 2—Effect of Time on Alcohol Response. Be sure they understand how the experiment was performed and answer any questions.
  3. Instruct students to click on the “Back” button and then on the link for Study 2a—Effect of Time.

Students will read instructions asking them to select the control mouse and count the number of grid lines it crosses for each time interval. These numbers should be recorded in their data table on Master 3.7.

  1. After collecting data on the fourth mouse, students should click on the “Back” button. Next, they click on the link for Study 2b—Effect of Time.
  2. Students repeat the data collection procedure in Step 3 for the experimental mice.

Study 3—Effect of Genetics on Response to Alcohol

  1. Explain to students that the different colors of the two mouse strains used in this study reflect genetic differences. Ask students what sort of genetic differences might exist between the two strains that could account for different responses to alcohol.

Students’ responses may be very general: differences in the brain or differences in the way the animals metabolize the alcohol may be suggested. Accept all reasonable answers and explain that it is time to investigate. Discussion of genetic variation can occur after this study and during Lessons 4 and 5.

  1. Give each student 1 copy of both Master 3.8, Study 3—Effect of Genetics on Alcohol Response, and Master 3.11, Study 3—Worksheet and Graph Template.
  2. Instruct students to read Master 3.8, Study 3—Effect of Genetics on Alcohol Response. Be sure that they understand how the experiment was performed and answer any questions.
  3. Instruct students to click on the “Back” button and then on the link for Study 3a—Effect of Genetics.
National Science Education Standards icon
Content Standard C:
Behavior is one kind of response an organism can make to an internal or external environmental stimulus.

Students will read instructions asking them to select a mouse and count the number of grid lines it crosses. This number should be recorded in their data table on Master 3.11. This process is repeated for the three remaining mice of that genetic strain.

  1. After collecting data on the fourth mouse, students should click on the “Back” button. Next they click on the link for Study 3b—Effect of Genetics to access the experiment with mice using a different genetic strain.
  2. Students repeat the data-collection procedure in Step 4 for mice of the second strain.

print activity iconAlternate version of Activity 1 for classes without access to the Internet:

Study 1—Effect of Alcohol Dose on Mouse Activity

  1. Explain that students will be analyzing data from three experiments to investigate the effects of alcohol on the movement of mice. They will begin by investigating the effects of alcohol dose on motor activity (movement) in mice.
  2. Give each student 1 copy of Master 3.1, Study 1Effect of Alcohol Dose on Mouse Movement, Master 3.2, Study 1Mouse Movement Data, and Master 3.3, Study 1Worksheet and Graph Template.
  1. Instruct students to read Master 3.1, Study 1—Effect of Alcohol Dose on Mouse Movement. Be sure they understand how the experiment was performed and answer any questions.
  2. Next, instruct students to count the number of grid lines crossed by each mouse on Master 3.2 and record the numbers in the appropriate spaces on their data table on Master 3.3.

Study 2—Effect of Time on Response to Alcohol

Teacher note
The experimental mice in this study were given alcohol at a dose of 3 grams alcohol/kg body weight.

  1. Give each student 1 copy of Master 3.4, Study 2—Effect of Time on Alcohol Response, Master 3.5, Study 2a—Control Mouse Movement Data, Master 3.6, Study 2b—Experimental Mouse Movement Data, and Master 3.7, Study 2—Worksheet and Graph Template.
  1. Instruct students to read Master 3.4, Study 2—Effect of Time on Alcohol Response. Be sure they understand how the experiment was performed and answer any questions.
  2. Instruct the students to count the number of grid lines crossed by each mouse on Masters 3.5 and 3.6 and record the numbers in their data table on Master 3.7.

Study 3—Effect of Genetics on Response to Alcohol

  1. Explain to students that this study uses two mouse strains with different genetic backgrounds. Ask students what sort of genetic differences might exist between the two strains that could account for differing responses to alcohol.

Students’ responses may be very general: differences in the brain or differences in the way the animals metabolize the alcohol may be suggested. Accept all reasonable answers and explain that it is time to investigate. Discussion of genetic variation can occur after this study and during Lessons 4 and 5.

  1. Give each student 1 copy of Master 3.8, Study 3—Effect of Genetics on Alcohol Response, Master 3.9, Study 3a—Mouse Movement Data, Master 3.10, Study 3b—Mouse Movement Data, and Master 3.11, Study 3—Worksheet and Graph Template.
National Science Education Standards icon
Content Standard A:

Think critically and logically to make the relationships between evidence and explanations.
  1. Instruct students to read Master 3.8, Study 3—Effect of Genetics on Alcohol Response. Be sure that they understand how the experiment was performed and answer any questions.
  2. Instruct students to count the number of grid lines crossed by each mouse on Masters 3.9 and 3.10 and record the numbers in their data table on Master 3.11.

Activity 2: Data Analysis and Discussion

Study 1—Effect of Alcohol Dose on Mouse Activity

  1. Students should use their data and the graph template on Master 3.3, Study 1—Worksheet and Graph Template, to create a plot of movement (number of grid lines crossed) versus alcohol dose. After students plot their data, instruct them to connect the data points with lines.

If you prefer, have students graph their data in histogram form.

  1. Students’ data for Study 1 should be as follows:
Dose of alcohol
(g alcohol/kg body weight)
Number of
grid lines crossed
0.0
10
1.5
16
2.0
20
3.0
4
  1. Ask the class how the movement of mice varies with increasing doses of alcohol.

Students should explain that mouse movement (number of grid lines crossed) increases as the dose of alcohol increases from 0 to 1.5 g/kg and again from 1.5 g/kg to 2.0 g/kg. Movement then decreases from 2.0 g/kg to 3.0 g/kg. Students should note that alcohol affects the movement of mice and that this effect depends on the dose of the alcohol.

Figure 3.2
Figure 3.2.
Data for Study 1—Effect of Alcohol Dose on Mouse Movement.
  1. Ask the class why the study included a mouse that was not given any alcohol.

The mouse that was not given alcohol is called a control mouse. Mice given alcohol are called the experimental mice. In order to reach a conclusion about the effect of alcohol on mouse movement, it is necessary to compare mice that were given alcohol with those that were not. Ideally, the control mouse should be just like the experimental mice except for the variable being tested (alcohol).

National Science Education Standards icon
Content Standard A:

Design and conduct a scientific investigation.

Study 2—Effect of Time on Response to Alcohol

  1. Students should use their data and the graph template on Master 3.7 to create a plot of movement (grid lines crossed) versus time after alcohol consumption. After plotting their data, instruct them to connect the data points with lines.

If you prefer, have students graph their data in histogram form. Data for the control and experimental mice should be plotted on the same graph.

  1. Students’ data for Study 2 should be as follows:
Control mouse Experimental mouse
Time
Number of grid lines crossed
Time
Number of grid lines crossed
0 to 1 min.
6
0 to 1 min.
12
5 to 6 min.
8
5 to 6 min.
10
10 to 11 min.
8
10 to 11 min.
6
15 to 16 min.
10
15 to 16 min.
2
  1. Ask the class to describe the effect of alcohol on mouse activity over time.

Compared with the control mouse, the mouse given alcohol was initially more active, but then as time passed, its activity slowed, while that of the control mouse increased.

  1. Ask students if they collected data on the mouse given alcohol for hours instead of minutes, what would happen?

This question may be difficult for students to answer. The movement of the mouse would slow to its lowest level and remain there for a while; then, the rate of movement would slowly increase up to the level of the control mouse. This is because the alcohol is being metabolized, and the blood alcohol concentration slowly decreases back to zero. When the BAC of the experimental mouse reaches zero, the mouse given alcohol and the control mouse would be expected to behave similarly.

Figure 3.3
Figure 3.3.
Data for Study 2—Effect of Time on Response to Alcohol.
  1. Why does the movement of the control mouse change over time?

This is an opportunity to discuss the nature of science. As mice become familiar with their environment, they tend to be less cautious. Since control mouse activity increases over time, this mouse is becoming familiar with its test surroundings.

Study 3—Effect of Genetics on Response to Alcohol

  1. Students should use their data and the graph template on Master 3.11 to create a plot of movement (number of grid lines crossed) versus alcohol dose. After plotting their data, instruct students to connect the data points for each mouse.

If you prefer, have the students graph their data in histogram form. Data for the two different mouse strains should be plotted on the same graph.

  1. Students' data for Study 3 should be as follows:
Study 3a mice Study 3b mice
Alcohol dose
(g alcohol/kg body weight)
Number of grid lines crossed
Alcohol dose
(g alcohol/kg body weight)
Number of grid lines crossed
0.0
10
0.0
12
1.5
10
1.5
14
2.0
6
2.0
20
3.0
1
3.0
6
  1. Ask the class whether the mice in Study 3a behaved like the mice in Study 3b.

In some ways the mice in Study 3a did behave like the mice in Study 3b. Initially, they both were fairly active. They responded differently, however, to the higher doses of alcohol. The mice in Study 3a rapidly slowed down their movement as the dose increased from 1.5 to 3.0 g alcohol/kg body weight. In contrast, the mice in Study 3b first increased, then decreased their movement as the alcohol dose went from 1.5 to 3.0 g alcohol/kg body weight.

Figure 3.4
Figure 3.4.
Data for Study 3—Effect of Genetics on Response to Alcohol.
  1. Does this experiment suggest that genes play a role in an animal’s response to alcohol? Why or why not?

The Study 3a and Study 3b mice show different responses to alcohol. The experimental environments for the two strains of mice were the same. The two mouse strains were handled identically in Study 3a and Study 3b. However, the two mouse strains have some genes that are different from each other. This genetic difference between the two mouse strains is the experimental variable. Consequently, the experiment suggests that genes play a role in response to alcohol.

  1. Ask the class to summarize what they have learned about alcohol’s effects on behavior from these three studies.

Students should mention that the effects of alcohol depend on the dose, the time after the alcohol was consumed, and the genetic background of the individual.

  1. Ask the class why scientists would use mice to investigate the effects of alcohol.
assessment icon
Assessment:

Ask students to define scientific controls as related to the design of experiments. Instruct them to describe how the concept of controls was used in each of the three mouse studies in this lesson.

Assessment:
Before the class discussion, you may want to have students write a short summary of what they learned from the mouse experiments. This gives students an opportunity to organize their thoughts. Listening to the discussion and reading their summaries will help you evaluate their understanding of the experiments.

Student responses will vary. Be sure to bring out the idea that scientists use animals in experiments when using humans is either impractical or unethical. Data obtained from mice have relevance because the mice have similar genes and biochemistry to humans. It is important to keep in mind the limitations of such studies, however. Humans have greater cognitive abilities than mice and can more readily alter their behaviors.

  1. On the basis of data from these three studies, can you make any inferences about the effects of alcohol on humans?

These studies allow students to make inferences about how alcohol might affect humans. For example, students may comment that at the lowest dose of alcohol, the mice became more active, then, as the dose was increased, less active. They may propose that something similar happens to people and comment that some people who have a few drinks at a party become more outgoing and talkative, but if they drink to excess, they can become very quiet and may even pass out.

Students should also reflect on individual variation in response to alcohol. Results of the study using mice of different strains suggest that different people may respond to the same dose of alcohol differently. This is true. Alcohol affects some people more profoundly than others. Some of the variation in response to alcohol is due to genetics (see Information about Alcohol, 8.2 Alcoholism and genetics).

  1. Conclude the lesson by reminding the class of the statement from the survey in Lesson 1, which declared that alcohol is a stimulant. At that time, students either agreed or disagreed with the statement. Ask the class to use what they learned in this lesson now to respond to that statement.

This likely will be a difficult concept for students. Based on the studies explored in this lesson, students may believe that alcohol initially acts as a stimulant. In fact, alcohol is always a depressant. It appears to be a stimulant because it initially depresses that part of the brain that controls inhibitions. See “Misconception 1: Alcohol is a stimulant.”


Web activity icon Lesson 3 Organizer: Web Version
Activity 1: Gathering Data
Study 1—Effect of Alcohol Dose on Mouse Activity
What the Teacher Does Procedure Reference
Have students log onto the Web site, click on “Lesson 1— Alcohol: Separating Fact from Fiction.” Select the type of Internet connection you are using. Have students click on a mouse video. Have them recall their conclusions about the effects of alcohol on mouse behavior. Web activity iconSteps 1 and 2
Explain to the class that they will analyze data from three experiments that investigate the effects of alcohol on the movement of mice. Step 3
Instruct students to return to the Web site’s main page by clicking on “Student Activities.” Step 4
Pass out to each student a copy of Master 3.1, Study 1—Effect of Alcohol Dose on Mouse Movement, and Master 3.3, Study 1—Worksheet and Graph Template. transparency iconStep 5

master icon
Have students read Master 3.1, Study 1—Effect of Alcohol Dose on Mouse Movement. Step 6

Instruct students to click on “Lesson 3—Responding to Alcohol: What’s Important?,” then on the “Start” button to listen to the introduction, and then on “Study 1—Effect of Dose.”

  • Allow students to collect data on the effect of alcohol dose.
Steps 7 and 8
Study 2—Effect of Time on Response to Alcohol
Pass out to each student a copy of Master 3.4, Study 2—Effect of Time on Alcohol Response, and Master 3.7, Study 2—Worksheet and Graph Template. master iconStep 1
Have students read Master 3.4, Study 2—Effect of Time on Alcohol Response. Step 2
Instruct students to click on the “Back” button and then on the link for Study 2a—Effect of Time. Have students collect data for the control mouse (mouse 2a). Step 3
Instruct students to click on the “Back” button and then on the link to Study 2b—Effect of Time. Have students collect data for the experimental mouse (mouse 2b). Steps 4 and 5
Study 3—Effect of Genetics on Response to Alcohol
Explain the use of two different mouse strains and ask students to suggest how genetics may influence a mouse’s response to alcohol. Step 1
Pass out to each student a copy of Master 3.8, Study 3— Effect of Genetics on Alcohol Response, and Master 3.11, Study 3—Worksheet and Graph Template. master iconStep 2
Have students read Master 3.8, Study 3—Effect of Genetics on Alcohol Response. Step 3
Instruct students to click on the “Back” button and then on the link for Study 3a—Effect of Genetics. Have students collect data for the first mouse strain. Step 4
Instruct students to click on the “Back” button and then on the link to Study 3b—Effect of Genetics. Have students collect data from the second mouse strain. Steps 5 and 6
Activity 2: Data Analysis and Discussion
Study 1—Effect of Alcohol Dose on Mouse Activity
What the Teacher Does Procedure Reference
Students create a graph of movement (grid lines crossed) versus alcohol dose on Master 3.3. master iconSteps 1 and 2

Ask students,

  • How does the movement of mice vary with increasing doses of alcohol?
  • Why did the study include a mouse that was not given any alcohol?
Steps 3 and 4
Study 2—Effect of Time on Response to Alcohol
Students create a graph of movement (grid lines crossed) versus time after alcohol consumption on Master 3.7. master iconSteps 1 and 2

Ask students,

  • How would you describe the effect of alcohol on mouse activity over time?
  • What would happen if you collected data in this study over hours rather than minutes?
  • Why does the movement of the control mouse change over time?
Steps 3–5
Study 3—Effect of Genetics on Response to Alcohol
Students create a graph of movement (grid lines crossed) versus alcohol dose on Master 3.11. Steps 1 and 2

Ask students,

  • Did the mice in Study 3a behave like the mice in Study 3b?
  • Does this study suggest whether genes play a role in the animal’s response to alcohol?
  • Summarize what you learned about alcohol’s effects on behavior.
  • Why do scientists use mice to investigate the effects of alcohol?
  • On the basis of these studies, can you make inferences about the effects of alcohol on humans?
  • Use what you learned here to respond to the statement that alcohol is a stimulant.
Steps 3–8

Web activity icon= Involves using the Internet.

master icon= Involves copying a master.

transparency icon= Involves using a transparency.

 

print activity icon Lesson 3 Organizer: Print Version
Activity 1: Gathering Data
Study 1—Effect of Alcohol Dose on Mouse Activity
What the Teacher Does Procedure Reference
Explain to the class that they will analyze data from three experiments that investigate the effects of alcohol on the movement of mice. Step 1
Give each student 1 copy of Master 3.1, Study 1—Effect of Alcohol Dose on Mouse Movement, Master 3.2, Study 1—Mouse Movement Data, and Master 3.3, Study 1—Worksheet and Graph Template. masters iconStep 2
Instruct students to read Master 3.1, Study 1—Effect of Alcohol Dose on Mouse Movement. Step 3
Instruct students to count the number of grid lines crossed by each mouse on Master 3.2, Study 1—Mouse Movement Data and record their data on Master 3.3, Study 1—Worksheet and Graph Template. Step 4
Study 2—Effect of Time on Response to Alcohol
Give each student 1 copy of Master 3.4, Study 2—Effect of Time on Alcohol Response, Master 3.5, Study 2a—Control Mouse Movement Data, Master 3.6, Study 2b—Experimental Mouse Movement Data, and Master 3.7, Study 2—Worksheet and Graph Template. masters iconStep 1
Have students read Master 3.4, Study 2—Effect of Time on Alcohol Response. Step 2
Instruct students to count the number of grid lines crossed by each mouse on Masters 3.5 and 3.6 and record their data on Master 3.7 Step 3
Study 3—Effect of Genetics on Response to Alcohol
Explain the use of two different mouse strains and ask students to suggest how genetics may influence a mouse’s response to alcohol. Step 1
Give each student 1 copy of Master 3.8, Study 3—Effect of Genetics on Alcohol Response, Master 3.9, Study 3a—Mouse Movement Data, Master 3.10, Study 3b—Mouse Movement Data, and Master 3.11, Study 3—Worksheet and Graph Template. masters iconStep 2
Have students read Master 3.8, Study 3—Effect of Genetics on Alcohol Response. Step 3
Instruct students to count the number of grid lines crossed by each mouse on Masters 3.9 and 3.10 and record their data on Master 3.11. Step 4
Activity 2: Data Analysis and Discussion
Study 1—Effect of Alcohol Dose on Mouse Activity
What the Teacher Does Procedure Reference
Students create a graph of movement (grid lines crossed) versus alcohol dose on Master 3.3. masters iconSteps 1 and 2

Ask students,

  • How does the movement of mice vary with increasing doses of alcohol?
  • Why did the study include a mouse that was not given any alcohol?
Steps 3 and 4
Study 2—Effect of Time on Response to Alcohol
Students create a graph of movement (grid lines crossed) versus time after alcohol consumption on Master 3.7. masters iconSteps 1 and 2

Ask students,

  • How would you describe the effect of alcohol on mouse activity over time?
  • What would happen if you collected data in this study over hours rather than minutes?
  • Why does the movement of the control mouse change over time?
Steps 3–5
Study 3—Effect of Genetics on Response to Alcohol
Students create a graph of movement (grid lines crossed) versus alcohol dose on Master 3.11. masters iconSteps 1 and 2

Ask students,

  • Did the mice in Study 3a behave like the mice in Study 3b?
  • Does this study suggest whether genes play a role in the animal’s response to alcohol?
  • Summarize what you learned about alcohol’s effects on behavior.
  • Why do scientists use mice to investigate the effects of alcohol?
  • On the basis of these studies, can you make inferences about the effects of alcohol on humans?
  • Use what you learned here to respond to the statement that alcohol is a stimulant.
Steps 3–8

masters icon= Involves copying a master.

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