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Lesson 5—Drug Addiction Is a Disease, So What Do We Do about It? student in a classroom

Teacher's Guide

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start of page contentDiabetes Type I

The following information is drawn from the American Diabetes Association Web site (http://www.diabetes.org/).

What is diabetes?
Type I diabetes is a disease that affects the way the body uses food. In a person with Type I diabetes, the body destroys the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Insulin is a hormone that regulates the level of sugar in the blood. Type I diabetes is also called immune-mediated diabetes, and was formerly known as insulin-dependent diabetes.

In Type II diabetes, once known as non-insulin-dependent diabetes, the pancreas does not make enough insulin or the body cannot use it properly. We will not discuss Type II diabetes any further.

Cause:
Scientists do not know what causes Type I diabetes, but there appears to be a genetic component to the cause. Other factors also are likely to increase the risk for getting diabetes. Diabetes is not contagious.

Symptoms and diagnosis:
Signs and symptoms of diabetes are:

Treatment:
Treatment for Type I diabetes involves keeping the level of sugar in the blood as close to normal (80-120 mg/dl) as possible. Treatment usually includes:

Long-term consequences of uncontrolled or poorly controlled diabetes:

Long-term outlook for diabetes if treated and controlled:
People with Type I diabetes can live happy, healthy lives if they follow their treatment plan.

See also: Heroin Addiction | Hypertension