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References

Introduction to the Module

  1. Loucks-Horsley, Susan, et al. 1998. Designing professional development for teachers of science and mathematics. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press, Inc.

Implementing the Module

  1. National Research Council. 1996. National science education standards. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

Lesson 1: Chemicals, Chemicals, Everywhere

  1. Eaton, D.L., and Gallagher, E.P. 1997. Introduction to the principles of toxicology. In I.G. Sipes, C.A. McQueen, and A.J. Gandolfi (Eds.), Comprehensive toxicology: General principles (Vol. 1). New York: Elsevier Science, Inc.
  2. Eaton, D.L., and Klaassen, C.D. 1996. Principles of toxicology. In Casarett & Doulls' toxicology: The basic science of poisons (5th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill.
  3. Conklin, S. (n.d.) Toxicology enrichment materials. Madison, WI: Author.
  4. Project Greenskate. Basic toxicology. Seattle, WA: University of Washington, Department of Environmental Resources. Retrieved December 15, 2000, from the World Wide Web: http://depts.washington.edu/hereuw/greensk8/basic2.htm.
  5. BSCS staff conversations with students. 1999, September.

Lesson 2: The Dose Makes the Poison

  1. Conklin, S. (n.d.) Toxicology enrichment materials. Madison, WI: Author.
  2. Society of Toxicology. Animals in research public policy statement. Retrieved August 9, 2000, from the World Wide Web: https://www.toxicology.org/ai/air/AIR_PubPolicy.asp.
  3. Eaton, D.L., and Klassen, C.D. 1996. Principles of toxicology. In Casarett and Doulls' toxicology: The basic science of poisons (5th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill.
  4. National Institute of Environmental Health Science. 1999, June 22. Science panel endorses new non-animal test (press release #10-99). Retrieved July 29, 1999, from the World Wide Web: http://www.niehs.nih.gov/news/newsroom/releases/1999/june22/index.cfm.
  5. Stokstad, E. 1999, November 5. News focus: Humane science finds sharper and kinder tools. Science, 286, 1068-1070.
  6. National Research Council. 1996. National science education standards. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

Lesson 3: Dose-Response Relationships

  1. Klassen, C.D. (Ed.) 1996. Casarette and Doulls' toxicology: The basic science of poisons (5th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill.
  2. Marczewski, A.E., and Kamrin, M. Toxicology for the citizen. East Lansing, MI: Michigan State University, Institute for Environmental Toxicology.
  3. Dose-response relationships in toxicology. East Lansing, MI: Michigan State University, Institute for Environmental Toxicology.

Lesson 4: Individual Responses Can Be Different

  1. Marczewski, A.E., and Kamrin, M. Toxicology for the citizen. East Lansing, MI: Michigan State University, Institute for Environmental Toxicology.
  2. Alcohol metabolism [Alcohol Alert No. 35]. Washington, DC: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Retrieved August 14, 2000, from the World Wide Web: http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/aa35.htm.
  3. Chudler, E.H. Caffeine. In Neuroscience for kids. Retrieved August 17, 2000, from the World Wide Web: http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/caff.html.
  4. What's your poison? Caffeine. ABC Online (Australian Broadcasting Corporation). Retrieved August 17, 2000, from the World Wide Web: abc.net.au/quantum/poison/caffeine/caffeine.htm.
  5. The truth about caffeine. MSNBC News. Retrieved June 14, 2000, from the World Wide Web.

Lesson 5: What Is the Risk?

  1. Allchin, D. 1999. The tragedy and triumph of Minamata. The American Biology Teacher, 61 (6), 413-419.
  2. Marczewski, A.E., and Kamrin, M. Toxicology for the citizen. East Lansing, MI: Michigan State University, Institute for Environmental Toxicology.

Lesson 6: Environmental Hazards

  1. National Research Council. 1996. National science education standards. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

Glossary

  1. Academic Press, 1997. Acetaminophen. Retrieved August 25, 2000, from the World Wide Web.
  2. Agency for Toxic Substances and Diseases Registry. Benzene. Retrieved August 25, 2000, from the World Wide Web: http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/mmg/mmg.asp?id=35&tid=14.
  3. BSCS and Videodiscovery. 1999. Cell biology and cancer. NIH Publication No. 99-4646.
  4. Charleen McQueen. Personal communication. 1999.
  5. Klassen, C.D. (Ed.) 1996. Casarette and Doulls' toxicology: The basic science of poisons (5th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill.
  6. Marczewski, A.E., and Kamrin, M. Toxicology for the citizen. East Lansing, MI: Michigan State University, Institute for Environmental Toxicology.
  7. National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. 1999, June 22. Science panel endorses new non-animal test (press release #10-99). Retrieved July 29, 1999, from the World Wide Web: http://www.niehs.nih.gov/news/newsroom/releases/1999/june22/index.cfm.
  8. National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. Retrieved August 25, 2000, from the World Wide Web: http://www.niehs.nih.gov.
  9. Needleman, H.L., and Landrigan, P.J. 1994. Raising children toxic free. New York, NY: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.
  10. Resource guide on children's environmental health. 1997. Public Health Institute/Children's Environmental Health Network.
  11. Sipes, I.G., McQueen, C.A., and Gandolfi, A.J. 1997. Comprehensive toxicology, Vol. 1. New York: Elsevier Science Ltd.
  12. Sullivan, T.F.P. 1993. Environmental regulatory glossary (6th ed.) Rockville, MD: Government Institutes, Inc.

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