BiblioTech CityHacks: In Search of Sleep icon

BiblioTech CityHacks: In Search of Sleep

How much sleep should you get? What happens when you're sleeping? What happens if you don't get enough sleep? In this interactive reading experience about sleep, circadian rhythms, and health, students help a young girl answer these questions so she can convince her mom to let her stay up late for CityHacks, a cool coding club that she wants to join.
See other sleep curriculum from The Partnership in Education.

Grades: 4-6
Produced by: The Partnership in Education, Duquesne University (SEPA funded)

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Biology of Human

Biology of Human helps students and the public better understand advances in biomedical research relating to human biology. This program seeks to increase awareness of and interest in new biomedical research developments, and their importance to people's health and communities. Resources include comic books, activities, lessons, and other curricula with accompanying teaching guides, videos, and additional learning materials.

Grades: Middle and high school
Produced by: University of Nebraska, Lincoln (SEPA funded)​​

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Biomedical Beat Educator's Corner: Genetics Miniseries

This Biomedical Beat miniseries explores the field of genetics—from how people inherit genes to how researchers study them. Students learn about different parts of genetics by reading the blog posts and discussing, applying, and quizzing what they learn through the activities outlined in the Educator’s Corner.

Grades: High school
Produced by: National Institute of General Medical Sciences

A cartoon image of a radiating barrier keeping colorful microbes from reaching a shield marked with a plus sign.

Biomedical Beat Educator's Corner: Immunology Miniseries

This Biomedical Beat miniseries explores the immune system, which protects the body from microbes that could cause infection. Students learn about different areas of immunology by reading the blog posts and discussing, applying, and quizzing what they learn through the activities outlined in the Educator’s Corner.

Grades: High school
Produced by: National Institute of General Medical Sciences

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BrainU: Neuroscience Resources

Students learn neuroscience concepts with materials that include lesson plans, handouts, activities, and videos. Lesson support and other teacher resources are also provided.

Grades: Elementary through high school
Produced by: University of Minnesota Twin Cities (SEPA funded)​

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Cannabis: The Facts You Need to Know

This curriculum informs students about cannabis, including its use as medicine, an explanation of CBD (cannabidiol), and the short- and long-term health effects of cannabis use, such as memory problems and addiction. Materials include a student article, lesson plan, teacher’s guide, and interactive.

Grades: 6-12
Produced by: National Institute on Drug Abuse and Scholastic, Inc.

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Dangerous Decibels Educator Resource Guide

This guide provides background information, hands-on activities, and experiments that educators can use to teach students about noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) and tinnitus (ringing in the ear). Activities cover the anatomy and physiology of the ear and the mechanics of hearing, the physics of sound, and ways to prevent NIHL.

Grades: Elementary through high school
Produced by: Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (SEPA funded)

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Dermis Defense Game

Players of this interactive follow a typical teen named Benji to help him beat his acne breakouts and learn about the immune system. Features include colorful, comic-style storytelling; scientific content about the immune system and its functions; challenging and fun gameplay; and links to supplementary reading materials about the immune system.

Grades: Middle and high school
Produced by: The Partnership in Education, Duquesne University (SEPA funded)

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DIY Human Body

Families and educators investigate and learn about the human body at home, at school, or anywhere with 13 easy-to-use, hands-on activities, plus videos and more. This resource is from the Lawrence Hall of Science project and is available in English and Spanish.

Grades: Elementary and middle school
Produced by: University of California, Berkeley, Lawrence Hall of Science, in partnership with University of California, San Francisco, Benioff Children’s Hospital (SEPA funded)

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Dr. Allevable’s Lab

This mobile app for iOS and Android devices provides games that explore topics related to regenerative medicine. Students become super scientists who learn about topics such as stem cells, growth factors, and regenerative medicine technologies.

Students can also check out Dr. Allevable's laboratory and meet her friend Regenerobot in animated videos.

Grades: 5-9
Produced by: The Partnership in Education, Duquesne University (SEPA funded)

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How Does the Human Body Produce Voice and Speech?​

How do we produce voice and speech? This animated video explains the processes of breathing, voicing, and speaking. It shows the sequential movements within the body that allow us to create voice and speech, starting with breathing.

Grades: 9-12
Produced by: National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

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How We Grow

Students learn about how different living things grow and develop through the story of a student who has to write an essay for his science class. The essay is on growth and development, but he just doesn’t understand what’s interesting about how we grow. That is, until his room starts to come to life.
See other cell and growth curriculum from The Partnership in Education.

Grades: 5-8
Produced by: The Partnership in Education, Duquesne University (SEPA funded)

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Monster Heart Medic

In this educational adventure from the Lawrence Hall of Science project, students explore the cardiovascular system and how healthy living affects it. They help diagnose a friendly, three-eyed monster and assist him on his path to a healthier life. Available in English and Spanish.

Grades: Elementary and middle school
Produced by: University of California, Berkeley, Lawrence Hall of Science, in partnership with University of California, San Francisco, Benioff Children’s Hospital (SEPA funded)​​​

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NEI for Kids

This web portal teaches kids about how their eyes work and how to keep them healthy, plus lots of fun eye facts.

Grades: Elementary through high school
Produced by: National Eye Institute (NEI)​​

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Our Cells, Our Selves

Travel along on a richly animated, dreamy bedtime story and explore the wonders of the immune system through the eyes of a 7-year-old who has just been diagnosed with type 1 juvenile diabetes. See other immune system curriculum from The Partnership in Education.

Grades: 5-8
Produced by: The Partnership in Education, Duquesne University (SEPA funded)​​

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Pathways: Circadian Rhythms

The circadian rhythms unit of Pathways introduces students to circadian rhythms, the “schedules” our bodies follow over the course of a day. These rhythms influence processes like hunger and the sleep-wake cycle. Pathways provides a collection of free educational resources about basic biomedical science and research careers. Be sure to check out the corresponding interactive activity and Kahoot! quiz.

Grades: Middle and high school
Produced by: National Institute of General Medical Sciences and Scholastic, Inc.

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Pathways: The Brain and Anesthesia

The brain and anesthesia unit of Pathways teaches students about how scientists research the mysteries of pain. It also describes the function of anesthesia on the brain and features some anesthesiologists who study pain. Pathways provides a collection of free educational resources about basic biomedical science and research careers. Be sure to check out the corresponding interactive activity and Kahoot! quiz.

Grades: Middle and high school
Produced by: National Institute of General Medical Sciences and Scholastic, Inc.

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Pathways: Vaccine Science

The vaccine science unit of Pathways teaches students how COVID-19 vaccines work in the body and introduces them to scientists dedicated to vaccine research. In addition, Vice President Kamala Harris and top researchers share their insights. Pathways provides a collection of free educational resources about basic biomedical science and research careers.

Grades: Middle and high school
Produced by: National Institute of General Medical Sciences and Scholastic, Inc.

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Resources from the University of Washington Genome Sciences Education Outreach

The University of Washington Genome Sciences Education Outreach (UWGSEO) provides various hands-on education resources. Its science curriculum on type 2 diabetes is available for high school students in biology, health, and family and consumer science classes. In the Blood Sugar Balance web game, players keep blood sugar levels within range through their food choices and exercise decisions, while regulating insulin and glucagon levels in the body. UWGSEO has also created curriculum that focuses on how food choices and the environment affect the human gut microbiome, as well as lessons on what students can learn from how the nematode C. elegans maintains balance in a changing environment.

Grades: High school
Produced by: University of Washington Genome Sciences Education Outreach (SEPA funded)

The Human Body icon.

The Human Body: Body, Joints, Muscles, and Skin

These online resources explore bones, joints, muscles, and skin, including what happens when they get hurt and how to keep them healthy. Intended for students in grades 4 through 6 who are learning about the human body, these educational materials include web content, fun and interactive Kahoot! quizzes, and suggestions for hands-on activities. Teachers may also use this information, which is mapped to national science education standards, to inform lesson plans.

Grades: 4-6
Produced by: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases